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Pain

RA Remission: The Missing Element

A study designed to assess the usefulness of different criteria for monitoring status in RA unearthed the discovery that only one patient in ten appears to reach stable remission. How can this be true? It also identified the one factor that contributed most to this disappointing record.

See Do Remission Criteria Fail RA Patients By Ignoring Pain?

Also on this topic:  Big Flaw in RA Treatment Success Record: Remaining Pain

Pain

Opioids, imaging, and constipation—try this trio of questions on issues related to pain management.

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There are probably few health care professionals who are unaware of the concerns about the apparent overprescription of opioids. However, we have had only limited information on how good a job physicians may actually be doing in prescribing these medications.

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Low back pain is one of the most common reasons patients seek primary care; 3 new studies confirm what most of them don’t want to hear: less treatment is better than more.

Up to 50% of patients taking opioids for an extended period develop constipation. Patient education and basic prevention can help mitigate the side effect.

Brief exposure to a variety of modifiable factors—physical and psychosocial—increases the risk of back pain.

An estimated 10% to 20% of women experience major depression during pregnancy. Opioids could double that trouble.

Good physical and social functioning may help avert insomnia in older people with musculoskeletal pain.

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