Targeting health factors in men may reduce mortality

October 4, 2010
RheumatologyNetwork Staff

The Journal of Musculoskeletal Medicine, The Journal of Musculoskeletal Medicine Vol 27 No 10, Volume 27, Issue 10

The risk of all-cause mortality in US men is inversely associated with the number of their positive health factors. Targeting more of the modifiable health factors in middle-aged men may provide them with substantial health benefits.

The risk of all-cause mortality in US men is inversely associated with the number of their positive health factors. Targeting more of the modifiable health factors in middle-aged men may provide them with substantial health benefits.

Byun and associates examined the combined effect of several positive health factors on all-cause mortality in 38,110 men aged 20 to 84 years from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. The factors included having normal weight, not currently smoking, consuming a moderate amount of alcohol, being physically active, and having a high degree of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF).

Obese persons had a higher risk of death than their counterparts with lower body mass index. Current smokers had a significantly higher risk of death than never smokers. The risk of all-cause mortality was significantly higher for inactive men than active men. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality on the basis of high, middle, and low third of CRF were 1.00, 1.10, and 1.69, respectively. Compared with men who had no positive health factors, the multivariable-adjusted HRs of all-cause mortality with 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 positive health factors were 0.78, 0.61, 0.54, 0.43, and 0.39, respectively.