Rheumatology

Podcast: Are your patients well verse on vitamin D intake?

August 03, 2020

Managing vitamin D levels may not be as straightforward as it would seem. There are factors that should be considered that are not often communicated to patients. In today's edition of Overdrive, the Rheumatology Network podcast, we talk with Dr. Suzanne Jan de Beur of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She serves as director of endocrinology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and president-elect of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

Podcast: Overdrive From Rheumatology Network with Dr. Jeffrey Sparks

August 02, 2020

In today's issue of Overdrive, a podcast from Rheumatology Network, we talk with Dr. Jeffrey Sparks, a rheumatologist with Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston who recently addressed the importance of an interdisciplinary and individualized approach in treating rheumatic disease patients who have Interstitial lung disease, a condition that can lead to worsen morbidity and mortality. Learn more in this interview.

Q&A: Smoking and Inflammation in Axial Spondyloarthritis

July 30, 2020

Patients with axial spondyloarthritis who smoke may be more likely to have sacroiliac joint inflammation if they have a blue‐collar job or low education, according to a study recently published in Arthritis & Rheumatology. In this Q&A with study author Elena Nikiphorou, M.B.B.S./B.Sc., M.D.(Res), Consultant Rheumatologist at King's College Hospital in London, U.K.,we discuss the study and its findings.

Q&A: BMI Link to Disease Activity in Axial Spondyloarthritis

July 30, 2020

Patients with axial spondyloarthritis may be more susceptible to higher disease activity if they are overweight or obese, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in RMD Open. In this Q&A with study author Jean Liew, M.D., of University of Washington in Seattle, we discuss the study and its significance.

First COVID-19, then Kawasaki-like Disease in Children

July 24, 2020

Children with COVID-19 can develop pediatric, inflammatory multisystemic syndrome, or PIMS, which can lead to symptoms similar to that of a painful vasculitis condition called Kawasaki disease. Today we talk with Jagadeesh Bayry, Ph.D., and Caroline Galeotti, M.D., of the University of Paris who recently described in Nature Reviews Rheumatology related pediatric cases they saw in their clinic.

Osteoporosis Screening May Be Necessary for Younger Postmenopausal Women

July 23, 2020

Osteoporosis isn't unique to older women, according to a review published in JAMA. At-risk younger women should be screened as well. In this Q&A, Dr. Carolyn J. Crandall of UCLA discusses osteoporosis screening in younger postmenopausal women.

Vitamin D Exposure for Optimal Bone Health

July 22, 2020

Managing vitamin D levels may not be as straightforward as it would seem. There are factors that should be considered that are not often communicated to patients. In today's edition of Overdrive, the Rheumatology Network podcast, we talk with Dr. Suzanne Jan de Beur of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She serves as director of endocrinology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and president-elect of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

Treatment Combo Successfully Resolves Cytokine Storm in COVID-19

July 21, 2020

High doses of methylprednisoline with tocilizumab (if needed) successfully resolved COVID-19-associated cytokine storm syndrome in treated patients, doctors report.

Rheumatology Network News Roundup: Lupus

July 17, 2020

In this week’s news roundup from Rheumatology Network, we talk with Dr. Chrstine Anastasiou, a rheumatologist with the University of California San Francisco who recently published a study in Arthritis Care and Research that finds significant improvements in mortality for hospitalized patients in the U.S. with systemic lupus, but there remains a high mortality rate among blacks and Hispanics with SLE, and, now among Asian/Pacific Islanders with the condition. Learn more in this interview.

Repeat ANA Testing Holds Little Value

July 16, 2020

This study suggests that doctors may want to reconsider allowing repeat antinuclear antibody (ANA) testing. Repeat tests are expensive and hold little value, shows this study from The Lancet Rheumatology.