Online Care as Effective as In-Person Care for Psoriasis

January 28, 2019

Online care and in-person care are equally effective at improving psoriasis symptoms, shows a study published in JAMA Network Open.

Online care and in-person care are equally effective at improving psoriasis symptoms, shows a study published in JAMA Network Open.

“Patients with chronic skin diseases need ongoing care, and depending on where they live, their access to dermatological care can be variable. Our study suggests that an online care delivery model is an effective way to bring high-quality care to patients regardless of where they live or what their work/life schedules look like,” reported lead author April Armstrong, M.D., MPH, professor of dermatology and associate dean for clinical research at the Keck School of Medicine at USC.

The 12-month randomized clinical equivalency trial shows an online, collaborative connected-health delivery model results in equivalent improvements in disease severity compared with in-person care among patients with psoriasis.

A randomized, clinical trial included 296 adult psoriasis patients, mean age 49 years, who were divided equally between online care and in-person care. Patients assigned to online care logged in to a secure, Web-based connected health platform where they could communicate with their primary care provider or dermatologist, share images of their skin and receive treatment recommendations. After reviewing transmitted information, health care providers evaluated patients’ progress, provided patient education and prescribed medications electronically. Patients assigned to in-person care received treatment as usual.

Psoriasis severity was measured at baseline and again at three, six, nine and 12 months. Between-group differences in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score and body surface area were within pre-specified equivalence margins, which demonstrated equivalence between the two interventions.

REFEREENCES
Armstrong AW, et al. Effectiveness of Online vs In-Person Care for Adults With PsoriasisA Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Netw Open. 2018;1(6):e183062. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.3062